Ventilation

CDC - Ventilation in Buildings

Description:

Updated March 23, 2021. FAQs and tips for ventilation as part of a layered approach to COVID-19 safety.

Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

Date: 05/06/21

Ventilation to Reduce COVID-19 Spread in Enclosed Work Areas During Cold Weather: A Survey of Construction Contractors

Description:

CPWR-The Center for Construction Research and Training (CPWR) and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) NORA Construction Sector Council’s COVID-19 Work Group have developed preliminary guidance for the construction industry on how to prevent the build-up of viral particles by improving ventilation and air quality in enclosed work areas. From December 11 to 18, 2020, CPWR conducted a brief, confidential online survey of industry decision-makers (e.g., construction contractors, owners, safety and health professionals) on behalf of the Work Group to collect information on the ventilation challenges facing the construction industry and steps being taken or planned to increase ventilation in enclosed work areas on job sites.

Source: CPWR - The Center for Construction Research and Training

Date: 03/12/21

Fate and Transport of Indoor Microbiological Aerosols (FaTIMA)

Description:

A new online tool from the National Institute of Standards and Technology is intended to help curb airborne transmission of SARS-CoV-2 – the coronavirus that causes COVID-19.

Developed by air quality experts at NIST, the free tool estimates exposure to potentially infectious aerosols in indoor spaces.

 

Source: National Institute of Standard and Technology

Date: 03/12/21

Quick Tips to Increase Ventilation at Indoor Construction Sites Without Operating HVAC Systems

Description:

COVID-19 is airborne and spreads faster and further in enclosed areas than outdoors. As temperatures drop, construction work is moving inside, work areas are being enclosed, and temporary warm-up stations are being set up. Since ventilation guidance issued by OSHA, the CDC, and other organizations largely focuses on workplaces with working HVAC systems, these are some suggestions on how to improve ventilation on construction sites.

Source: CPWR - The Center for Construction Research and Training

Date: 02/23/21

Ventilation for Industrial Settings during the COVID-19 Pandemic

Description:

This White Paper, developed by the Industrial Ventilation Committee of the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH®), originates from concern about the proper use of ventilation controls in industrial workplaces where SARS-CoV-2 (the Coronavirus responsible for COVID-19) is potentially present. This volunteer committee, with expertise in industrial ventilation, offers guidance on the topic of industrial ventilation to industrial/commercial facilities that are planning operational controls to reduce the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic for employees returning to work around the world. These recommended practices are intended as guidance for Occupational and Environmental Health and Safety professionals and others including plant managers as they seek to mitigate exposures for their workforce during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Source: American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists

Date: 03/12/21

Effects of ventilation on the indoor spread of COVID-19

Description:

Although the relative importance of airborne transmission of the SARS-CoV-2 virus is controversial, increasing evidence suggests that understanding airflows is important for estimation of the risk of contracting COVID-19. The data available so far indicate that indoor transmission of the virus far outstrips outdoor transmission, possibly due to longer exposure times and the decreased turbulence levels (and therefore dispersion) found indoors. In this paper we discuss the role of building ventilation on the possible pathways of airborne particles and examine the fluid mechanics of the processes involved.

Source: Rajesh K. Bhagat, M. S. Davies Wykes, Stuart B. Dalziel, and P. F. Linden

Date: 03/12/21

Ventilation and Air Quality for Reducing Transmission of COVID-19

Description:

Because good ventilation and indoor air quality are important in reducing airborne exposure to viruses, this guidance outlines methods for decreasing the number of viral particles in indoor air by increasing the intake of outdoor air and/or through effective air filtration.

Source: Washington State Department of Health

Date: 03/12/21

COVID-19 Guidance on Ventilation in the Workplace

Description:

OSHA has released new guidance on work with a HVAC professional to ensure that building ventilation is operating as intended to keep workers healthy. Guidance includes ensuring all HVAC systems are fully functional, preventing personal fans from blowing air from one worker to another and upgrade filters to MERV 13 if possible, among others.

Source: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA)

Date: 03/12/21

Assessment and mitigation of aerosol airborne SARS-CoV-2 transmission in laboratory and office environments

Description:

This study introduces a "framework for estimating the risk of transmitting SARS-CoV-2 via aerosols in laboratory and office settings, based on an exponential dose-response model and analysis of air flow and purification in typical heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems."  (September 22, 2020)

Source: Journal of Occupational and Environmental Hygiene

Date: 03/12/21

HVAC filtration for controlling infectious airborne disease transmission in indoor environments: Predicting risk reductions and operational costs

Description:

This research finds that recirculating HVAC filtration was predicted to achieve risk reductions at lower costs of operation than equivalent levels of outdoor air ventilation.

Source: Building and Environment

Date: 03/12/21

UC Davis Energy and Efficiency Institute and NEMI White Paper on Ventilation Verification and Optimization in Educational Facilities

Description:

This White paper uses CDC and ASHRAE recommendations along with recent studies on ventilation in schools to develop a plan for ventilation verification. It can be downloaded and was updated June 4, 2020. 

Source: National Energy Management Institute

Date: 03/12/21

OSHA: COVID-19 Control and Prevention - Construction Work

Description:

This OSHA guidance supplements its general, interim guidance for all workers with potential occupational exposure to SARS-Co-V-2. It is for construction employers and workers, such as those engaged in carpentry, ironworking, plumbing, electrical, heating/ ventilation/air conditioning/ventilation, masonry and concrete work, utility construction work, and earthmoving activities. 

Source: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA)

Date: 03/12/21

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